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Sunday September 14th, Monday September 15th, 2003

“Southern and East African Experts Panel on Designing Successful Conservation
and Development Interventions at the Wildlife/Livestock Interface:
Implications for Wildlife, Livestock, and Human Health”

Durban International Convention Center (ICC) – Room 3C

Associated with the “Building Broader Support for Protected Areas” Stream, World Parks Congress

PLEASE make sure you register and collect your security passes from World Parks Congress officials at the Durban Exhibition Center (DEC) before the 14th or early on the morning of the 14th so as not to miss our 9AM start.



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

Overview of Challenges to Conservation and Development at the Livestock/Wildlife Interface:

9:00 AM Welcome/Introduction – Why Are We Here? (10 min): Steve Osofsky, Billy Karesh (WCS Field Veterinary Program and IUCN SSC Veterinary Specialist Group) and Mike Kock (IUCN SSC Southern African Sustainable Use Specialist Group and WCS Field Veterinary Program)

9:10  Brief Self-Introductions, and Day 1 Guidelines (10 min): ‘Round the Room’: Susie Ellis, Facilitator (CI)

9:20  Opening Address (20 min): Richard Kock (PACE/OAU-IBAR, and IUCN SSC Veterinary Specialist Group) “What is this Infamous ‘Wildlife / Livestock Interface?’ – A Review of Current Knowledge on the Subject”

9:40 Invited presentations begin (10 min each)


The State of Play

9:40 “Transfrontier Parks in Southern Africa: Animal Health Challenges”
(Roy Bengis)

9:50  “Diseases of Importance at the Wildlife / Livestock Interface in Kenya”
(Elizabeth Wambwa)

10:00 “Relevance of the ROSELT/OSS Programme in Maintaining the Ecological Integrity of Protected Areas and Surrounding Lands” 
(Jesse Njoka)

10:10 “The Influence of Veterinary Control Fences on Certain Wild Large Mammal Species in the Caprivi Strip, Namibia”
(Rowan Martin)

10:20 “Wildlife, Livestock and Food Security in the South-East Lowveld of Zimbabwe”
(David Cumming)

10:30–10:50 TEA BREAK #1


Perspectives on Pathogens

10:50 “Tuberculosis- What Makes it an Ideal Disease for the Interface?”
(Anita Michel)

11:00 “Bovine Tuberculosis in the African Buffalo: The Role of Population Models”
(Wayne Getz)

11:10 “Experiences and Challenges of Wildlife Health Management in National Parks of Tanzania”
(Titus Mlengeya and Vitalis Lyaruu)

11:20 “Control Options for Human Sleeping Sickness in Relation to the Animal Reservoir of Disease”
(Susan Welburn et al.)

11:30 “Rinderpest Surveillance in Uganda National Parks”
(Chris Rutebarika)

11:40 “Virus Topotypes and the Role of Wildlife in Foot and Mouth Disease in Africa”
(Wilna Vosloo)

11:50 “The Impact of Disease on Endangered Carnivores”
(Craig Packer)

12:00 “Veterinary Challenges Regarding the Utilization of the Kafue Lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) in Zambia”
(Victor Siamudaala) (talk delivered by Misheck Mulumba)


12:10–12:25
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

12:30–1:30 LUNCH (Group Facilitators and Recorders meet with Susie Ellis over lunch.)


Challenges and Opportunities – Within and Out of the Box

1:30  “The Health Paradigm and Disease Control: Consideration of the Health of Ecosystems and Impacts on Human Health and Rural Livelihoods”
(Mike Kock)

1:40  “Conservancies: Integrating Wildlife Land-Use Options into the Livelihood, Development, and Conservation Strategies Of Namibian Communities”
(Chris Weaver)

1:50 “‘Counting Sheep’: The Comparative Advantages of Wildlife and Livestock—A Community Perspective”
(Michael Murphree)

2:00 “Foot and Mouth Disease Management and Land-Use Implications in the Zimbabwean Lowveld: the Rationale for Creating a Biosphere Reserve”
(Raoul du Toit)

2:10 “Protected Areas, Human Livelihoods and Healthy Animals: Ideas for Improvements in Conservation and Development Interventions”
(Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka)

2:20–2:35 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

2:35 “Impacts and Value of Wildlife in Pastoral Livestock Production Systems in Kenya”
(Fumi Mizutani, Elizabeth Muthiani)

2:45 “A Regional / Community Approach to Conservation and Development Interventions at the Livestock / Wildlife Interface”
(George Gitau)

2:55 “Complementarity Between Community-Based Animal Health Delivery Systems and Community-Based Wildlife Management? An Analysis of Experiences Linking Animal Health to Conflict Management in Pastoralist Areas of the Horn of Africa”
(Tim Leyland and Richard Grahn)

3:05 “Community-Based Animal Health Care—An Opportunity to Help Overcome the Sometimes Conflicting Interests of Rural Communities and Conservationists at the Wildlife/Livestock Interface—Challenges and Research Needs” (John Woodford) (Talk not given.)

3:15–3:30 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

3:30–3:50 TEA BREAK #2

3:50 “Introduction of Foot and Mouth Disease-Infected Buffalo into the SAVE Valley Conservancy in Zimbabwe: Success or Failure?”
(Chris Foggin and G. Connear )

4:00 “The Disease-Free Buffalo Breeding Project of the State Veterinary Services and South African National Parks”
(Markus Hofmeyr)

4:10 “Control of Domestic Dog Diseases in Protected Area Management and the Conservation of Endangered Carnivores”
(Karen Laurenson with S. Cleaveland et al.)

4:20 “Impacts of Wildlife Infections on Human and Livestock Health with Special Reference to Tanzania: Implications for Protected Area Management”
(Sarah Cleaveland with T. Mlengeya et al.)

4:30 “Synergies Between Livestock Husbandry and Wildlife Conservation in Southern Province, Zambia”
(Dale Lewis)

4:40-4:50 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

 

4:50–5:00 WORKING GROUPS IDENTIFIED AND INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED (Susie Ellis, Steve Osofsky) 

A maximum of 5 total Working Groups are suggested as follows (bolded names are the suggested Working Group Facilitators; italicized names are the suggested Recorders). If you feel you’ve been assigned to the ‘wrong’ group or role, please let the facilitator know before the session begins:

(1) Botswana/Namibia/Zimbabwe – Guy Freeland, Mike Kock, Neo Mapitse, Gary Mullins, Chris Weaver, Michael Murphree, David Cumming, Raoul du Toit, Chris Foggin, Rowan Martin, Robert Cook, Steve Osofsky, Mark Eisler, Delphine Purves

(2) Kenya – George Gitau, Agi Kiss, Richard Kock, Fumi Mizutani, Elizabeth Muthiani, Jacob Mwanzia, Jesse Njoka, Elizabeth Wambwa, Helga Recke, Kenneth Waithiru

(3) Malawi/Mozambique/Zambia – Misheck Mulumba, Rod de Vletter, Simon Munthali, Bartolomeu Soto, Dale Lewis, Victor Siamudaala, Tim Leyland, Laurel Neme

(4) South Africa – Roy Bengis, Koos Coetzer, Jacques Flamand, Wayne Getz, Markus Hofmeyr, Nick Kriek, Woody Meltzer, Anita Michel, Philip Nyhus, Cobus Raath, Wilna Vosloo, Banie Penzhorn

(5) Tanzania/Uganda – Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, Chris Rutebarika, Innocent Rwego, Michael Woodford, Philippe Chardonnet, Sarah Cleaveland, Robert Fyumagwa, William Karesh, Karen Laurenson, Titus Mlengeya, Pete Morkel, Craig Packer, Susan Welburn, John Woodford, Mary Phillips

5:00–?   WORKING GROUPS SESSION 1.
1. Brainstorm to produce a list of priority protected areas in your Working Group’s region, including those that are / could become transboundary.
2. Identify the 2-3 highest priority protected areas.
3. Define (list) the major health-related challenges/threats for each priority area.

End of Day One Working Sessions

Don’t forget tonight’s Group Dinner at the Protea Hotel Edward!



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

New Working Groups formed as needed based on highest-priority protected areas as indicated by Day 1 outputs/priorities. 

Overview Moderated Working Groups outline project concepts they think can practically address the health-related challenges discussed yesterday. Working Groups are to be landscape-focused so that the proposal outlines that are developed are geo-referenced to places (which include core protected areas of some type) of conservation interest (specific landscapes of focus will likely depend on representation at the meeting). The emphasis should be on projects that can and should be developed and implemented soon. Concepts emphasizing further research must justify that the proposed research is critical to improved management practices on the ground.

8:00–8:30 AM  PLENARY SESSION.
Review of yesterday’s outputs/priorities, new Working Group assignments and instructions (Susie Ellis and Steve Osofsky).

8:30–10:00 WORKING GROUP SESSION 2.
1. Prioritize health-related challenges for the top 1-3 priority protected areas identified within each group. 
2. Begin defining 2-3 pilot projects (including transboundary endeavors) that can address the 2-3 highest priority health-related challenges for each area (what are the most important things to do to address these challenges- why, who, what, how, when?)  Please see worksheets to be provided.

10:00–10:30 TEA BREAK #1

10:30–12:00 WORKING GROUP SESSION 3. 
Continue working to flesh-out 2-3 pilot projects (including transboundary endeavors) that can address the 2-3 highest priority health-related challenges for each area (what are the most important things to do to address these challenges?)

12:00–1:00  LUNCH (Working lunch – One to two representatives from each Working Group volunteer to convene to delineate “measures of success”- what criteria should these conservation and development interventions be measured by? A suggested list of indicators of success relevant to goals at the livestock/wildlife interface should be outlined. This outline is to be distributed to all participants as the afternoon Working Groups get underway.)

1:00–2:15  WORKING GROUP SESSION 4.
Finalize 2-3 pilot projects (including transboundary endeavors) that can address the 2-3 highest priority health-related challenges for each area (what are the most important things to do to address these challenges?)

2:15–3:45  PLENARY: WORKING GROUP REPORTS (10 MINUTES EACH, AND 5 MINUTES QUESTIONS/DISCUSSION PER GROUP)

3:45–4:00   TEA BREAK #2

4:00–4:45  WORKING GROUP SESSION 5. 
Refine/finalize pilot projects based on feedback from plenary session.  Groups should reference how identified or modified “measures of success” may help them monitor conservation / development results in their landscapes. HAND IN FINAL ELECTRONIC AND HARD COPY VERSIONS TO FACILITATOR.

4:45–5:15  GROUP DISCUSSION/REFLECTION

5:15–5:30 Closing Address (15 min): Billy Karesh, Richard Kock (Co-Chairs, IUCN SSC Veterinary Specialist Group) Key Themes Emerging from this Forum

5:30–5:45  Meeting Conclusion (15 min): Steve Osofsky (WCS) and Mike Kock (SASUSG/WCS) Thanks, and Next Steps.

End of Meeting

Follow-up:  One product of the meeting will be proceedings of the papers presented on Day 1, and a written summary of the outlines for envisioned future work produced by Day 2’s Working Groups.  Longer term, WCS would like to work with interested participants from the various Working Groups to help them more fully develop the outlines into full proposals for eventual donor consideration.  Obviously this will involve broader consultation within the regions of focus with a wider range of stakeholders than could be accommodated at this initial forum.

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